THE BEGINNING

Welcome to the first post! No need to mark your calendar or remember how it happened, or what you were wearing today. Just tell your friends, aiight?

First off, I am not a writer.

I’m a fan.

I grew up on hip hop. If you’re like me, when you kick back and reminisce, the soundtrack to those good and bad old days is hip hop. Yeah, there’s a little R&B in the mix, but the majority of it is beats and rhymes. I consider the Fatboys to be a serious rap group, remember when LL was a new jack, and can recall when RUN-DMC was the biggest rap group ever. The problem is I’m a little older now—not really a problem, it’s just a fact. But with age things change. There was a time when I had to have to work to hear a rap song on the radio, or wade through all sorts of rock videos just to see one rap artist or black artist.

Nowadays hip hop rules the land. As a teenager I never thought this day would come. Unfortunately, like myself, many of us older heads don’t feel at home in this brave new hip-hop world. What we see and hear; yeah, they call it hip hop, but it just ain’t hitting the same. When I get together with my friends and music comes up, we sound like our parents when somebody invariable says, “These kids today don’t know good music!”

But the question is “Do you still love hip-hop?”

I’m gonna guess yes, since you’re still checking out the site. Some of us have given up the fight, switched to smooth jazz, neo-soul, or just listen to Best of CDs from old school artists. But the new stuff? Hell to the naw. I felt the same way and I’m a DJ. But one day, I had an epiphany: I realized I’m not supposed to like the songs that the kids listen to today, ya know? Ask me why (pause).

Cause I’m grown! Think about it: when you were a teen did your mom or dad like your music? Nope. Couldn’t believe their ears. “What’s all that spittin’ and makin’ noise?” (beatboxin) or “I can’t understand what they’re saying.” Your parents, like my parents, were having the same conversations we are having today. What are these kids listening to? But that’s the conversation we’re supposed to have. To quote a wise comedian, I’m a grown-ass man! On the down side of my thirties, I shouldn’t like the same songs as a thirteen-year-old, or at the very least it shouldn’t mean the same thing to me.

When I realized this, I was straight. I didn’t take hip hop’s change so personally. I stopped being repulsed and disgusted when “Laffy Taffy” came on. Now does this all mean I’m done, that I’m going to leave hip hop behind? Not at all! I just have to take it back to the old school: go seek out what I like. Anyway, what is love if there isn’t some sort of test?

TO BE CONTINUED

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